Commit 57e04eed authored by Ingo Molnar's avatar Ingo Molnar
Browse files

Merge tag 'perf-urgent-for-mingo-5.5-20191216' of...

Merge tag 'perf-urgent-for-mingo-5.5-20191216' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/acme/linux

 into perf/urgent

Pull perf/urgent fixes:

perf top:

 Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo:

 - Do not bail out when perf_env__read_cpuid() returns ENOSYS, which
   has been reported happening on aarch64.

perf metricgroup:

  Kajol Jain:

  - Fix printing event names of metric group with multiple events

vendor events:

x86:

  Ravi Bangoria:

  - Fix Kernel_Utilization metric.

s390:

  Ed Maste:

  - Fix counter long description for DTLB1_GPAGE_WRITES and L1D_RO_EXCL_WRITES.

perf header:

  Michael Petlan:

  - Fix false warning when there are no duplicate cache entries

libtraceevent:

  Sudip Mukherjee:

  - Allow custom libdir path

API headers:

  Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo:

  - Sync linux/kvm.h with the kernel sources.

Signed-off-by: default avatarArnaldo Carvalho de Melo <acme@redhat.com>
Signed-off-by: default avatarIngo Molnar <mingo@kernel.org>
parents 0f60a0bc 58b3baff
*.c diff=cpp
*.h diff=cpp
*.dtsi diff=dts
*.dts diff=dts
......@@ -32,7 +32,6 @@
*.lzo
*.mod
*.mod.c
*.ns_deps
*.o
*.o.*
*.patch
......@@ -61,6 +60,7 @@ modules.order
/System.map
/Module.markers
/modules.builtin.modinfo
/modules.nsdeps
#
# RPM spec file (make rpm-pkg)
......
......@@ -105,6 +105,9 @@ James E Wilson <wilson@specifix.com>
James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org> <james.hogan@imgtec.com>
James Hogan <jhogan@kernel.org> <james@albanarts.com>
James Ketrenos <jketreno@io.(none)>
Jan Glauber <jan.glauber@gmail.com> <jang@de.ibm.com>
Jan Glauber <jan.glauber@gmail.com> <jang@linux.vnet.ibm.com>
Jan Glauber <jan.glauber@gmail.com> <jglauber@cavium.com>
Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca> <jgg@mellanox.com>
Jason Gunthorpe <jgg@ziepe.ca> <jgunthorpe@obsidianresearch.com>
Javi Merino <javi.merino@kernel.org> <javi.merino@arm.com>
......@@ -156,6 +159,7 @@ Mark Brown <broonie@sirena.org.uk>
Mark Yao <markyao0591@gmail.com> <mark.yao@rock-chips.com>
Martin Kepplinger <martink@posteo.de> <martin.kepplinger@theobroma-systems.com>
Martin Kepplinger <martink@posteo.de> <martin.kepplinger@ginzinger.com>
Martin Kepplinger <martink@posteo.de> <martin.kepplinger@puri.sm>
Mathieu Othacehe <m.othacehe@gmail.com>
Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org> <matthew.r.wilcox@intel.com>
Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org> <matthew@wil.cx>
......
......@@ -1875,8 +1875,9 @@ S: The Netherlands
N: Martin Kepplinger
E: martink@posteo.de
E: martin.kepplinger@ginzinger.com
E: martin.kepplinger@puri.sm
W: http://www.martinkepplinger.com
P: 4096R/5AB387D3 F208 2B88 0F9E 4239 3468 6E3F 5003 98DF 5AB3 87D3
D: mma8452 accelerators iio driver
D: pegasus_notetaker input driver
D: Kernel fixes and cleanups
......
......@@ -6,10 +6,19 @@ Description: Configures which IO port the host side of the UART
Users: OpenBMC. Proposed changes should be mailed to
openbmc@lists.ozlabs.org
What: /sys/bus/platform/drivers/aspeed-vuart*/sirq
What: /sys/bus/platform/drivers/aspeed-vuart/*/sirq
Date: April 2017
Contact: Jeremy Kerr <jk@ozlabs.org>
Description: Configures which interrupt number the host side of
the UART will appear on the host <-> BMC LPC bus.
Users: OpenBMC. Proposed changes should be mailed to
openbmc@lists.ozlabs.org
What: /sys/bus/platform/drivers/aspeed-vuart/*/sirq_polarity
Date: July 2019
Contact: Oskar Senft <osk@google.com>
Description: Configures the polarity of the serial interrupt to the
host via the BMC LPC bus.
Set to 0 for active-low or 1 for active-high.
Users: OpenBMC. Proposed changes should be mailed to
openbmc@lists.ozlabs.org
......@@ -347,3 +347,16 @@ Description:
If the device has any Peer-to-Peer memory registered, this
file contains a '1' if the memory has been published for
use outside the driver that owns the device.
What: /sys/bus/pci/devices/.../link/clkpm
/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../link/l0s_aspm
/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../link/l1_aspm
/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../link/l1_1_aspm
/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../link/l1_2_aspm
/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../link/l1_1_pcipm
/sys/bus/pci/devices/.../link/l1_2_pcipm
Date: October 2019
Contact: Heiner Kallweit <hkallweit1@gmail.com>
Description: If ASPM is supported for an endpoint, these files can be
used to disable or enable the individual power management
states. Write y/1/on to enable, n/0/off to disable.
......@@ -31,6 +31,23 @@ Description:
Output will a version string be similar to the example below:
08B6
What: /sys/bus/platform/devices/GOOG000C\:00/usb_charge
Date: October 2019
KernelVersion: 5.5
Description:
Control the USB PowerShare Policy. USB PowerShare is a policy
which affects charging via the special USB PowerShare port
(marked with a small lightning bolt or battery icon) when in
low power states:
- In S0, the port will always provide power.
- In S0ix, if usb_charge is enabled, then power will be
supplied to the port when on AC or if battery is > 50%.
Else no power is supplied.
- In S5, if usb_charge is enabled, then power will be supplied
to the port when on AC. Else no power is supplied.
Input should be either "0" or "1".
What: /sys/bus/platform/devices/GOOG000C\:00/version
Date: May 2019
KernelVersion: 5.3
......
......@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ endif
SPHINXBUILD = sphinx-build
SPHINXOPTS =
SPHINXDIRS = .
_SPHINXDIRS = $(patsubst $(srctree)/Documentation/%/conf.py,%,$(wildcard $(srctree)/Documentation/*/conf.py))
_SPHINXDIRS = $(patsubst $(srctree)/Documentation/%/index.rst,%,$(wildcard $(srctree)/Documentation/*/index.rst))
SPHINX_CONF = conf.py
PAPER =
BUILDDIR = $(obj)/output
......@@ -33,8 +33,6 @@ ifeq ($(HAVE_SPHINX),0)
else # HAVE_SPHINX
export SPHINXOPTS = $(shell perl -e 'open IN,"sphinx-build --version 2>&1 |"; while (<IN>) { if (m/([\d\.]+)/) { print "-jauto" if ($$1 >= "1.7") } ;} close IN')
# User-friendly check for pdflatex and latexmk
HAVE_PDFLATEX := $(shell if which $(PDFLATEX) >/dev/null 2>&1; then echo 1; else echo 0; fi)
HAVE_LATEXMK := $(shell if which latexmk >/dev/null 2>&1; then echo 1; else echo 0; fi)
......@@ -67,6 +65,8 @@ quiet_cmd_sphinx = SPHINX $@ --> file://$(abspath $(BUILDDIR)/$3/$4)
cmd_sphinx = $(MAKE) BUILDDIR=$(abspath $(BUILDDIR)) $(build)=Documentation/media $2 && \
PYTHONDONTWRITEBYTECODE=1 \
BUILDDIR=$(abspath $(BUILDDIR)) SPHINX_CONF=$(abspath $(srctree)/$(src)/$5/$(SPHINX_CONF)) \
$(PYTHON) $(srctree)/scripts/jobserver-exec \
$(SHELL) $(srctree)/Documentation/sphinx/parallel-wrapper.sh \
$(SPHINXBUILD) \
-b $2 \
-c $(abspath $(srctree)/$(src)) \
......@@ -128,8 +128,10 @@ dochelp:
@echo ' pdfdocs - PDF'
@echo ' epubdocs - EPUB'
@echo ' xmldocs - XML'
@echo ' linkcheckdocs - check for broken external links (will connect to external hosts)'
@echo ' refcheckdocs - check for references to non-existing files under Documentation'
@echo ' linkcheckdocs - check for broken external links'
@echo ' (will connect to external hosts)'
@echo ' refcheckdocs - check for references to non-existing files under'
@echo ' Documentation'
@echo ' cleandocs - clean all generated files'
@echo
@echo ' make SPHINXDIRS="s1 s2" [target] Generate only docs of folder s1, s2'
......
......@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ setid capabilities from the application completely and refactor the process
spawning semantics in the application (e.g. by using a privileged helper program
to do process spawning and UID/GID transitions). Unfortunately, there are a
number of semantics around process spawning that would be affected by this, such
as fork() calls where the program doesn???t immediately call exec() after the
as fork() calls where the program doesn't immediately call exec() after the
fork(), parent processes specifying custom environment variables or command line
args for spawned child processes, or inheritance of file handles across a
fork()/exec(). Because of this, as solution that uses a privileged helper in
......@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ own user namespace, and only approved UIDs/GIDs could be mapped back to the
initial system user namespace, affectively preventing privilege escalation.
Unfortunately, it is not generally feasible to use user namespaces in isolation,
without pairing them with other namespace types, which is not always an option.
Linux checks for capabilities based off of the user namespace that ???owns??? some
Linux checks for capabilities based off of the user namespace that "owns" some
entity. For example, Linux has the notion that network namespaces are owned by
the user namespace in which they were created. A consequence of this is that
capability checks for access to a given network namespace are done by checking
......
......@@ -1120,8 +1120,9 @@ PAGE_SIZE multiple when read back.
Best-effort memory protection. If the memory usage of a
cgroup is within its effective low boundary, the cgroup's
memory won't be reclaimed unless memory can be reclaimed
from unprotected cgroups. Above the effective low boundary (or
memory won't be reclaimed unless there is no reclaimable
memory available in unprotected cgroups.
Above the effective low boundary (or
effective min boundary if it is higher), pages are reclaimed
proportionally to the overage, reducing reclaim pressure for
smaller overages.
......@@ -1925,7 +1926,7 @@ Cpuset Interface Files
It accepts only the following input values when written to.
"root" - a paritition root
"root" - a partition root
"member" - a non-root member of a partition
When set to be a partition root, the current cgroup is the
......
=============================================================
Usage of the new open sourced rbu (Remote BIOS Update) driver
=============================================================
=========================================
Dell Remote BIOS Update driver (dell_rbu)
=========================================
Purpose
=======
Document demonstrating the use of the Dell Remote BIOS Update driver.
Document demonstrating the use of the Dell Remote BIOS Update driver
for updating BIOS images on Dell servers and desktops.
Scope
......@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ maintains a link list of packets for reading them back.
If the dell_rbu driver is unloaded all the allocated memory is freed.
The rbu driver needs to have an application (as mentioned above)which will
The rbu driver needs to have an application (as mentioned above) which will
inform the BIOS to enable the update in the next system reboot.
The user should not unload the rbu driver after downloading the BIOS image
......@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ be downloaded. It is done as below::
echo XXXX > /sys/devices/platform/dell_rbu/packet_size
In the packet update mechanism, the user needs to create a new file having
packets of data arranged back to back. It can be done as follows
packets of data arranged back to back. It can be done as follows:
The user creates packets header, gets the chunk of the BIOS image and
places it next to the packetheader; now, the packetheader + BIOS image chunk
added together should match the specified packet_size. This makes one
......@@ -114,7 +114,7 @@ The entries can be recreated by doing the following::
echo init > /sys/devices/platform/dell_rbu/image_type
.. note:: echoing init in image_type does not change it original value.
.. note:: echoing init in image_type does not change its original value.
Also the driver provides /sys/devices/platform/dell_rbu/data readonly file to
read back the image downloaded.
......
......@@ -31,218 +31,233 @@ configured "bad blocks" will be treated as bad, or bypassed.
This allows the pre-writing of test data and metadata prior to
simulating a "failure" event where bad sectors start to appear.
Table parameters:
-----------------
Table parameters
----------------
<device_path> <offset> <blksz>
Mandatory parameters:
<device_path>: path to the block device.
<offset>: offset to data area from start of device_path
<blksz>: block size in bytes
<device_path>:
Path to the block device.
<offset>:
Offset to data area from start of device_path
<blksz>:
Block size in bytes
(minimum 512, maximum 1073741824, must be a power of 2)
Usage instructions:
-------------------
Usage instructions
------------------
First, find the size (in 512-byte sectors) of the device to be used:
First, find the size (in 512-byte sectors) of the device to be used::
$ sudo blockdev --getsz /dev/vdb1
33552384
$ sudo blockdev --getsz /dev/vdb1
33552384
Create the dm-dust device:
(For a device with a block size of 512 bytes)
$ sudo dmsetup create dust1 --table '0 33552384 dust /dev/vdb1 0 512'
::
$ sudo dmsetup create dust1 --table '0 33552384 dust /dev/vdb1 0 512'
(For a device with a block size of 4096 bytes)
$ sudo dmsetup create dust1 --table '0 33552384 dust /dev/vdb1 0 4096'
::
$ sudo dmsetup create dust1 --table '0 33552384 dust /dev/vdb1 0 4096'
Check the status of the read behavior ("bypass" indicates that all I/O
will be passed through to the underlying device):
$ sudo dmsetup status dust1
0 33552384 dust 252:17 bypass
will be passed through to the underlying device)::
$ sudo dmsetup status dust1
0 33552384 dust 252:17 bypass
$ sudo dd if=/dev/mapper/dust1 of=/dev/null bs=512 count=128 iflag=direct
128+0 records in
128+0 records out
$ sudo dd if=/dev/mapper/dust1 of=/dev/null bs=512 count=128 iflag=direct
128+0 records in
128+0 records out
$ sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/mapper/dust1 bs=512 count=128 oflag=direct
128+0 records in
128+0 records out
$ sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/mapper/dust1 bs=512 count=128 oflag=direct
128+0 records in
128+0 records out
Adding and removing bad blocks:
-------------------------------
Adding and removing bad blocks
------------------------------
At any time (i.e.: whether the device has the "bad block" emulation
enabled or disabled), bad blocks may be added or removed from the
device via the "addbadblock" and "removebadblock" messages:
device via the "addbadblock" and "removebadblock" messages::
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 addbadblock 60
kernel: device-mapper: dust: badblock added at block 60
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 addbadblock 60
kernel: device-mapper: dust: badblock added at block 60
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 addbadblock 67
kernel: device-mapper: dust: badblock added at block 67
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 addbadblock 67
kernel: device-mapper: dust: badblock added at block 67
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 addbadblock 72
kernel: device-mapper: dust: badblock added at block 72
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 addbadblock 72
kernel: device-mapper: dust: badblock added at block 72
These bad blocks will be stored in the "bad block list".
While the device is in "bypass" mode, reads and writes will succeed:
While the device is in "bypass" mode, reads and writes will succeed::
$ sudo dmsetup status dust1
0 33552384 dust 252:17 bypass
$ sudo dmsetup status dust1
0 33552384 dust 252:17 bypass
Enabling block read failures:
-----------------------------
Enabling block read failures
----------------------------
To enable the "fail read on bad block" behavior, send the "enable" message:
To enable the "fail read on bad block" behavior, send the "enable" message::
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 enable
kernel: device-mapper: dust: enabling read failures on bad sectors
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 enable
kernel: device-mapper: dust: enabling read failures on bad sectors
$ sudo dmsetup status dust1
0 33552384 dust 252:17 fail_read_on_bad_block
$ sudo dmsetup status dust1
0 33552384 dust 252:17 fail_read_on_bad_block
With the device in "fail read on bad block" mode, attempting to read a
block will encounter an "Input/output error":
block will encounter an "Input/output error"::
$ sudo dd if=/dev/mapper/dust1 of=/dev/null bs=512 count=1 skip=67 iflag=direct
dd: error reading '/dev/mapper/dust1': Input/output error
0+0 records in
0+0 records out
0 bytes copied, 0.00040651 s, 0.0 kB/s
$ sudo dd if=/dev/mapper/dust1 of=/dev/null bs=512 count=1 skip=67 iflag=direct
dd: error reading '/dev/mapper/dust1': Input/output error
0+0 records in
0+0 records out
0 bytes copied, 0.00040651 s, 0.0 kB/s
...and writing to the bad blocks will remove the blocks from the list,
therefore emulating the "remap" behavior of hard disk drives:
therefore emulating the "remap" behavior of hard disk drives::
$ sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/mapper/dust1 bs=512 count=128 oflag=direct
128+0 records in
128+0 records out
$ sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/mapper/dust1 bs=512 count=128 oflag=direct
128+0 records in
128+0 records out
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 60 removed from badblocklist by write
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 67 removed from badblocklist by write
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 72 removed from badblocklist by write
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 87 removed from badblocklist by write
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 60 removed from badblocklist by write
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 67 removed from badblocklist by write
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 72 removed from badblocklist by write
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 87 removed from badblocklist by write
Bad block add/remove error handling:
------------------------------------
Bad block add/remove error handling
-----------------------------------
Attempting to add a bad block that already exists in the list will
result in an "Invalid argument" error, as well as a helpful message:
result in an "Invalid argument" error, as well as a helpful message::
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 addbadblock 88
device-mapper: message ioctl on dust1 failed: Invalid argument
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 88 already in badblocklist
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 addbadblock 88
device-mapper: message ioctl on dust1 failed: Invalid argument
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 88 already in badblocklist
Attempting to remove a bad block that doesn't exist in the list will
result in an "Invalid argument" error, as well as a helpful message:
result in an "Invalid argument" error, as well as a helpful message::
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 removebadblock 87
device-mapper: message ioctl on dust1 failed: Invalid argument
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 87 not found in badblocklist
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 removebadblock 87
device-mapper: message ioctl on dust1 failed: Invalid argument
kernel: device-mapper: dust: block 87 not found in badblocklist
Counting the number of bad blocks in the bad block list:
--------------------------------------------------------
Counting the number of bad blocks in the bad block list
-------------------------------------------------------
To count the number of bad blocks configured in the device, run the
following message command:
following message command::
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 countbadblocks
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 countbadblocks
A message will print with the number of bad blocks currently
configured on the device:
configured on the device::
kernel: device-mapper: dust: countbadblocks: 895 badblock(s) found
kernel: device-mapper: dust: countbadblocks: 895 badblock(s) found
Querying for specific bad blocks:
---------------------------------
Querying for specific bad blocks
--------------------------------
To find out if a specific block is in the bad block list, run the
following message command:
following message command::
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 queryblock 72
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 queryblock 72
The following message will print if the block is in the list:
device-mapper: dust: queryblock: block 72 found in badblocklist
The following message will print if the block is in the list::
The following message will print if the block is in the list:
device-mapper: dust: queryblock: block 72 not found in badblocklist
device-mapper: dust: queryblock: block 72 found in badblocklist
The following message will print if the block is not in the list::
device-mapper: dust: queryblock: block 72 not found in badblocklist
The "queryblock" message command will work in both the "enabled"
and "disabled" modes, allowing the verification of whether a block
will be treated as "bad" without having to issue I/O to the device,
or having to "enable" the bad block emulation.
Clearing the bad block list:
----------------------------
Clearing the bad block list
---------------------------
To clear the bad block list (without needing to individually run
a "removebadblock" message command for every block), run the
following message command:
following message command::
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 clearbadblocks
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 clearbadblocks
After clearing the bad block list, the following message will appear:
After clearing the bad block list, the following message will appear::
kernel: device-mapper: dust: clearbadblocks: badblocks cleared
kernel: device-mapper: dust: clearbadblocks: badblocks cleared
If there were no bad blocks to clear, the following message will
appear:
appear::
kernel: device-mapper: dust: clearbadblocks: no badblocks found
kernel: device-mapper: dust: clearbadblocks: no badblocks found
Message commands list:
----------------------
Message commands list
---------------------
Below is a list of the messages that can be sent to a dust device:
Operations on blocks (requires a <blknum> argument):
Operations on blocks (requires a <blknum> argument)::
addbadblock <blknum>
queryblock <blknum>
removebadblock <blknum>
addbadblock <blknum>
queryblock <blknum>
removebadblock <blknum>
...where <blknum> is a block number within range of the device
(corresponding to the block size of the device.)
(corresponding to the block size of the device.)
Single argument message commands:
Single argument message commands::
countbadblocks
clearbadblocks
disable
enable
quiet
countbadblocks
clearbadblocks
disable
enable
quiet
Device removal:
---------------
Device removal
--------------
When finished, remove the device via the "dmsetup remove" command:
When finished, remove the device via the "dmsetup remove" command::
$ sudo dmsetup remove dust1
$ sudo dmsetup remove dust1
Quiet mode:
-----------
Quiet mode
----------
On test runs with many bad blocks, it may be desirable to avoid
excessive logging (from bad blocks added, removed, or "remapped").
This can be done by enabling "quiet mode" via the following message:
This can be done by enabling "quiet mode" via the following message::
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 quiet
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 quiet
This will suppress log messages from add / remove / removed by write
operations. Log messages from "countbadblocks" or "queryblock"
message commands will still print in quiet mode.
The status of quiet mode can be seen by running "dmsetup status":
The status of quiet mode can be seen by running "dmsetup status"::
$ sudo dmsetup status dust1
0 33552384 dust 252:17 fail_read_on_bad_block quiet
$ sudo dmsetup status dust1
0 33552384 dust 252:17 fail_read_on_bad_block quiet
To disable quiet mode, send the "quiet" message again:
To disable quiet mode, send the "quiet" message again::
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 quiet
$ sudo dmsetup message dust1 0 quiet
$ sudo dmsetup status dust1
0 33552384 dust 252:17 fail_read_on_bad_block verbose
$ sudo dmsetup status dust1
0 33552384 dust 252:17 fail_read_on_bad_block verbose
(The presence of "verbose" indicates normal logging.)
......
......@@ -9,6 +9,7 @@ Device Mapper
cache
delay
dm-crypt
dm-dust
dm-flakey
dm-init
dm-integrity
......
......@@ -57,60 +57,61 @@ configure specific aspects of kernel behavior to your liking.
.. toctree::
:maxdepth: 1
initrd
cgroup-v2
cgroup-v1/index
serial-console
braille-console
parport
md
module-signing
rapidio
sysrq
unicode
vga-softcursor
binfmt-misc
mono
java
ras
bcache
blockdev/index
ext4
binderfs
cifs/index
xfs