1. 30 Aug, 2019 1 commit
  2. 04 Jun, 2019 1 commit
  3. 05 Apr, 2019 1 commit
  4. 25 Mar, 2019 1 commit
    • Stefan Roese's avatar
      spi: mt7621: Move SPI driver out of staging · cbd66c62
      Stefan Roese authored and Mark Brown's avatar Mark Brown committed
      
      
      This patch moves the MT7621 SPI driver, which is used on some Ralink /
      MediaTek MT76xx MIPS SoC's, out of the staging directory. No changes to
      the source code are done in this patch.
      
      This driver version was tested successfully on an MT7688 based platform
      with an SPI NOR on CS0 and an SPI NAND on CS1 without any issues (so
      far).
      
      This patch also documents the devicetree bindings for the MT7621 SPI
      device driver.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarStefan Roese <sr@denx.de>
      Cc: Rob Herring <robh@kernel.org>
      Cc: Mark Brown <broonie@kernel.org>
      Cc: Greg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
      Cc: NeilBrown <neil@brown.name>
      Cc: Sankalp Negi <sankalpnegi2310@gmail.com>
      Cc: Chuanhong Guo <gch981213@gmail.com>
      Cc: John Crispin <john@phrozen.org>
      Cc: Armando Miraglia <arma2ff0@gmail.com>
      Signed-off-by: Mark Brown's avatarMark Brown <broonie@kernel.org>
      cbd66c62
  5. 19 Feb, 2019 1 commit
  6. 28 Jan, 2019 1 commit
    • Yogesh Narayan Gaur's avatar
      spi: spi-mem: Add driver for NXP FlexSPI controller · a5356aef
      Yogesh Narayan Gaur authored and Mark Brown's avatar Mark Brown committed
      
      
      - Add driver for NXP FlexSPI host controller
      
      (0) What is the FlexSPI controller?
       FlexSPI is a flexsible SPI host controller which supports two SPI
       channels and up to 4 external devices. Each channel supports
       Single/Dual/Quad/Octal mode data transfer (1/2/4/8 bidirectional
       data lines) i.e. FlexSPI acts as an interface to external devices,
       maximum 4, each with up to 8 bidirectional data lines.
      
       It uses new SPI memory interface of the SPI framework to issue
       flash memory operations to up to four connected flash
       devices (2 buses with 2 CS each).
      
      (1) Tested this driver with the mtd_debug and JFFS2 filesystem utility
       on NXP LX2160ARDB and LX2160AQDS targets.
       LX2160ARDB is having two NOR slave device connected on single bus A
       i.e. A0 and A1 (CS0 and CS1).
       LX2160AQDS is having two NOR slave device connected on separate buses
       one flash on A0 and second on B1 i.e. (CS0 and CS3).
       Verified this driver on following SPI NOR flashes:
          Micron, mt35xu512ab, [Read - 1 bit mode]
          Cypress, s25fl512s, [Read - 1/2/4 bit mode]
      Signed-off-by: default avatarYogesh Narayan Gaur <yogeshnarayan.gaur@nxp.com>
      Reviewed-by: default avatarFrieder Schrempf <frieder.schrempf@kontron.de>
      Reviewed-by: default avatarBoris Brezillon <bbrezillon@kernel.org>
      Tested-by: default avatarAshish Kumar <Ashish.Kumar@nxp.com>
      Signed-off-by: Mark Brown's avatarMark Brown <broonie@kernel.org>
      a5356aef
  7. 07 Jan, 2019 1 commit
  8. 13 Nov, 2018 1 commit
  9. 07 Nov, 2018 1 commit
  10. 05 Nov, 2018 1 commit
  11. 19 Oct, 2018 1 commit
    • Ludovic Barre's avatar
      spi: spi-mem: add stm32 qspi controller · c530cd1d
      Ludovic Barre authored and Mark Brown's avatar Mark Brown committed
      
      
      The qspi controller is a specialized communication interface
      targeting single, dual or quad SPI Flash memories (NOR/NAND).
      
      It can operate in any of the following modes:
      -indirect mode: all the operations are performed using the quadspi
       registers
      -read memory-mapped mode: the external Flash memory is mapped to the
       microcontroller address space and is seen by the system as if it was
       an internal memory
      
      tested on:
      -NOR: mx66l51235l
      -NAND: MT29F2G01ABAGD
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLudovic Barre <ludovic.barre@st.com>
      Signed-off-by: Mark Brown's avatarMark Brown <broonie@kernel.org>
      c530cd1d
  12. 11 Oct, 2018 2 commits
  13. 28 Sep, 2018 1 commit
  14. 10 Sep, 2018 1 commit
  15. 28 Aug, 2018 1 commit
  16. 01 Aug, 2018 1 commit
  17. 11 May, 2018 1 commit
  18. 10 May, 2018 1 commit
  19. 26 Mar, 2018 1 commit
  20. 02 Nov, 2017 1 commit
    • Greg Kroah-Hartman's avatar
      License cleanup: add SPDX GPL-2.0 license identifier to files with no license · b2441318
      Greg Kroah-Hartman authored
      
      
      Many source files in the tree are missing licensing information, which
      makes it harder for compliance tools to determine the correct license.
      
      By default all files without license information are under the default
      license of the kernel, which is GPL version 2.
      
      Update the files which contain no license information with the 'GPL-2.0'
      SPDX license identifier.  The SPDX identifier is a legally binding
      shorthand, which can be used instead of the full boiler plate text.
      
      This patch is based on work done by Thomas Gleixner and Kate Stewart and
      Philippe Ombredanne.
      
      How this work was done:
      
      Patches were generated and checked against linux-4.14-rc6 for a subset of
      the use cases:
       - file had no licensing information it it.
       - file was a */uapi/* one with no licensing information in it,
       - file was a */uapi/* one with existing licensing information,
      
      Further patches will be generated in subsequent months to fix up cases
      where non-standard license headers were used, and references to license
      had to be inferred by heuristics based on keywords.
      
      The analysis to determine which SPDX License Identifier to be applied to
      a file was done in a spreadsheet of side by side results from of the
      output of two independent scanners (ScanCode & Windriver) producing SPDX
      tag:value files created by Philippe Ombredanne.  Philippe prepared the
      base worksheet, and did an initial spot review of a few 1000 files.
      
      The 4.13 kernel was the starting point of the analysis with 60,537 files
      assessed.  Kate Stewart did a file by file comparison of the scanner
      results in the spreadsheet to determine which SPDX license identifier(s)
      to be applied to the file. She confirmed any determination that was not
      immediately clear with lawyers working with the Linux Foundation.
      
      Criteria used to select files for SPDX license identifier tagging was:
       - Files considered eligible had to be source code files.
       - Make and config files were included as candidates if they contained >5
         lines of source
       - File already had some variant of a license header in it (even if <5
         lines).
      
      All documentation files were explicitly excluded.
      
      The following heuristics were used to determine which SPDX license
      identifiers to apply.
      
       - when both scanners couldn't find any license traces, file was
         considered to have no license information in it, and the top level
         COPYING file license applied.
      
         For non */uapi/* files that summary was:
      
         SPDX license identifier                            # files
         ---------------------------------------------------|-------
         GPL-2.0                                              11139
      
         and resulted in the first patch in this series.
      
         If that file was a */uapi/* path one, it was "GPL-2.0 WITH
         Linux-syscall-note" otherwise it was "GPL-2.0".  Results of that was:
      
         SPDX license identifier                            # files
         ---------------------------------------------------|-------
         GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note                        930
      
         and resulted in the second patch in this series.
      
       - if a file had some form of licensing information in it, and was one
         of the */uapi/* ones, it was denoted with the Linux-syscall-note if
         any GPL family license was found in the file or had no licensing in
         it (per prior point).  Results summary:
      
         SPDX license identifier                            # files
         ---------------------------------------------------|------
         GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note                       270
         GPL-2.0+ WITH Linux-syscall-note                      169
         ((GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note) OR BSD-2-Clause)    21
         ((GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note) OR BSD-3-Clause)    17
         LGPL-2.1+ WITH Linux-syscall-note                      15
         GPL-1.0+ WITH Linux-syscall-note                       14
         ((GPL-2.0+ WITH Linux-syscall-note) OR BSD-3-Clause)    5
         LGPL-2.0+ WITH Linux-syscall-note                       4
         LGPL-2.1 WITH Linux-syscall-note                        3
         ((GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note) OR MIT)              3
         ((GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note) AND MIT)             1
      
         and that resulted in the third patch in this series.
      
       - when the two scanners agreed on the detected license(s), that became
         the concluded license(s).
      
       - when there was disagreement between the two scanners (one detected a
         license but the other didn't, or they both detected different
         licenses) a manual inspection of the file occurred.
      
       - In most cases a manual inspection of the information in the file
         resulted in a clear resolution of the license that should apply (and
         which scanner probably needed to revisit its heuristics).
      
       - When it was not immediately clear, the license identifier was
         confirmed with lawyers working with the Linux Foundation.
      
       - If there was any question as to the appropriate license identifier,
         the file was flagged for further research and to be revisited later
         in time.
      
      In total, over 70 hours of logged manual review was done on the
      spreadsheet to determine the SPDX license identifiers to apply to the
      source files by Kate, Philippe, Thomas and, in some cases, confirmation
      by lawyers working with the Linux Foundation.
      
      Kate also obtained a third independent scan of the 4.13 code base from
      FOSSology, and compared selected files where the other two scanners
      disagreed against that SPDX file, to see if there was new insights.  The
      Windriver scanner is based on an older version of FOSSology in part, so
      they are related.
      
      Thomas did random spot checks in about 500 files from the spreadsheets
      for the uapi headers and agreed with SPDX license identifier in the
      files he inspected. For the non-uapi files Thomas did random spot checks
      in about 15000 files.
      
      In initial set of patches against 4.14-rc6, 3 files were found to have
      copy/paste license identifier errors, and have been fixed to reflect the
      correct identifier.
      
      Additionally Philippe spent 10 hours this week doing a detailed manual
      inspection and review of the 12,461 patched files from the initial patch
      version early this week with:
       - a full scancode scan run, collecting the matched texts, detected
         license ids and scores
       - reviewing anything where there was a license detected (about 500+
         files) to ensure that the applied SPDX license was correct
       - reviewing anything where there was no detection but the patch license
         was not GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note to ensure that the applied
         SPDX license was correct
      
      This produced a worksheet with 20 files needing minor correction.  This
      worksheet was then exported into 3 different .csv files for the
      different types of files to be modified.
      
      These .csv files were then reviewed by Greg.  Thomas wrote a script to
      parse the csv files and add the proper SPDX tag to the file, in the
      format that the file expected.  This script was further refined by Greg
      based on the output to detect more types of files automatically and to
      distinguish between header and source .c files (which need different
      comment types.)  Finally Greg ran the script using the .csv files to
      generate the patches.
      Reviewed-by: default avatarKate Stewart <kstewart@linuxfoundation.org>
      Reviewed-by: default avatarPhilippe Ombredanne <pombredanne@nexb.com>
      Reviewed-by: default avatarThomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarGreg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
      b2441318
  21. 19 Sep, 2017 1 commit
  22. 21 Jun, 2017 1 commit
  23. 26 May, 2017 3 commits
  24. 24 May, 2017 1 commit
  25. 14 Feb, 2017 1 commit
    • Hauke Mehrtens's avatar
      spi: lantiq-ssc: add support for Lantiq SSC SPI controller · 17f84b79
      Hauke Mehrtens authored and Mark Brown's avatar Mark Brown committed
      
      
      This driver supports the Lantiq SSC SPI controller in master
      mode. This controller is found on Intel (former Lantiq) SoCs like
      the Danube, Falcon, xRX200, xRX300.
      
      The hardware uses two hardware FIFOs one for received and one for
      transferred bytes. When the driver writes data into the transmit FIFO
      the complete word is taken from the FIFO into a shift register. The
      data from this shift register is then written to the wire. This driver
      uses the interrupts signaling the status of the FIFOs and not the shift
      register. It is also possible to use the interrupts for the shift
      register, but they will send a signal after every word. When using the
      interrupts for the shift register we get a signal when the last word is
      written into the shift register and not when it is written to the wire.
      After all FIFOs are empty the driver busy waits till the hardware is
      not busy any more and returns the transfer status.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarDaniel Schwierzeck <daniel.schwierzeck@gmail.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarHauke Mehrtens <hauke@hauke-m.de>
      Signed-off-by: Mark Brown's avatarMark Brown <broonie@kernel.org>
      17f84b79
  26. 08 Dec, 2016 1 commit
  27. 22 Nov, 2016 1 commit
  28. 24 Sep, 2016 1 commit
  29. 14 Sep, 2016 2 commits
  30. 19 Aug, 2016 1 commit
  31. 08 Aug, 2016 1 commit
    • Rich Felker's avatar
      spi: add driver for J-Core SPI controller · 2cb1b3b3
      Rich Felker authored and Mark Brown's avatar Mark Brown committed
      
      
      The J-Core "spi2" device is a PIO-based SPI master controller. It
      differs from "bitbang" devices in that that it's clocked in hardware
      rather than via soft clock modulation over gpio, and performs
      byte-at-a-time transfers between the cpu and SPI controller.
      
      This driver will be extended to support future versions of the J-Core
      SPI controller with DMA transfers when they become available.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarRich Felker <dalias@libc.org>
      Signed-off-by: Mark Brown's avatarMark Brown <broonie@kernel.org>
      2cb1b3b3
  32. 24 Jul, 2016 1 commit
  33. 18 Apr, 2016 1 commit
  34. 04 Apr, 2016 1 commit
  35. 24 Feb, 2016 1 commit
  36. 05 Feb, 2016 1 commit
    • Lars-Peter Clausen's avatar
      spi: Add Analog Devices AXI SPI Engine controller support · b1353d1c
      Lars-Peter Clausen authored and Mark Brown's avatar Mark Brown committed
      This patch adds support for the AXI SPI Engine controller which is a FPGA
      soft-peripheral which is used in some of Analog Devices' reference designs.
      
      The AXI SPI Engine controller is part of the SPI Engine framework[1] and
      allows memory mapped access to the SPI Engine control bus. This allows it
      to be used as a general purpose software driven SPI controller. The SPI
      Engine in addition offers some optional advanced acceleration and
      offloading capabilities, which are not part of this patch though and will
      be introduced separately.
      
      At the core of the SPI Engine framework is a small sort of co-processor
      that accepts a command stream and turns the commands into low-level SPI
      transactions. Communication is done through three memory mapped FIFOs in
      the register map of the AXI SPI Engine peripheral. One FIFO for the command
      stream and one each for transmit and receive data.
      
      The driver translates a spi_message in a command stream and writes it to
      the peripheral which executes it asynchronously. This allows it to perform
      very precise timings which are required for some SPI slave devices to
      achieve maximum performance (e.g. analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog
      converters). The execution flow is synchronized to the host system by a
      special synchronize instruction which generates a interrupt.
      
      [1] https://wiki.analog.com/resources/fpga/peripherals/spi_engine
      
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLars-Peter Clausen <lars@metafoo.de>
      Signed-off-by: Mark Brown's avatarMark Brown <broonie@kernel.org>
      b1353d1c